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Consistency and High Expectations: Managing and changing behavior with students with ASD

Autism Immersed Podcast, Season 2, Episode 1

On today’s podcast, Behavioral Specialist Sean Hanrahan stops by to talk to us about managing students and children in the home with behavioral issues, the importance of expectation and consistency, and how these methods are vital to the practice of Social Immersion.

Sean is a certified teacher of TCI, therapeutic crisis intervention, and teaches and certifies teachers. He is also one of founders of Oakstone Academy, the school that developed and practices successful Social Immersion.

Sean will be speaking at the Oakstone Institute this fall which you can find out more about at oakstoneacademy.org

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Oakstone Palm Beach comes to Ohio!

Part 1 of 2

Autism Immersed podcast, season 1, episode 5

Oakstone’s initial goals was to not just create a school but methods and tools for any parent or teacher to use. Parents from the Palm Beach area approached Dr. Rebecca Morrison, the school’s founder, about creating their own Social Immersion school in their community.

On our 5th and 6th episodes we will be playing an interview we did a few months back with staff and student leaders from the Oakstone Academy at Palm Beach.

Episode 5: Oakstone Palm Beach
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Autism Immersed podcast, episode 2

Our second episode is part 2 of an interview with Dr. Rebecca Morrison, the founder of Oakstone Academy in Westerville, OH. 

We will be discussing how the school started, its mission, and exploring their one of a kind “social immersion model” that puts students on the Autism spectrum in typical classrooms with typically developing peers. 

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PLAY PICS: Building play skills

With an emphasis on the benefits of inclusion and social immersion, parents and educators of students with autism are seeking effective ways for their children to continue skill acquisition and enhancement, while also exposing their children to typically developing peers.  But what does one do if a child who has access to an immersion environment doesn’t know how to play?

For most children, play is a naturally occurring phenomena that promotes their engagement and learning, independent performance, and social inclusion.  Children who are unable to participate in play experiences are at risk for future deficits and have greater difficulty adjusting to preschool environments where individual instruction is limited.  For children with autism, absent or restricted play skills might prevent opportunities for learning and successful participation in inclusive, general education classrooms.  Play Pics is a teaching tool to help students with autism spectrum disorder learn various basic play actions, expand their play repertoire, learn to self-monitor and recall play skills practiced, to improve initiation, play choice selection, and play variability.

Play Pics uses a research based strategy  formulated from Dr. Rebecca Morrison et al’s study, “Increasing Play Skills of Child With Autism Using Activity Schedules and Correspondence Training.”  (For full citation, see our PUBLICATIONS tab.) In this study, it was found that children with autism spectrum disorders benefit greatly from using picture schedules and visuals to promote independent performance and positive behavior changes when playing with toys.  Play Pics will help children develop play skills, make play choices, access more play areas in a classroom setting, increase their independent performance during playtime, and promote peer engagement. Play Pics also incorporates a self-monitoring card which promotes communication and language skills connected to play.

Play Pics are currently available for 5 common preschool toys: baby doll, ball, blocks, bus, and rocket. This dynamic and engaging strategy has been field tested, both in immersion preschool classrooms and at home. Our teachers and therapists find Play Pics to be a valuable tool to teach play skills. Our parents are experiencing success as well. Check out what a few parents have said about Play Pics:

“My son loves Play Pics [with a Ball]!  He has even started using the skills with his cousins and kids in our community!”

“I am so grateful for Play Pics [with a Bus]! Thank you guys for giving that to me to use with my son.  I have seen it help in many areas. He cleans up better now and follows directions more.”

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Legal Developments Highlight Importance of Inclusion

Last year saw a number of important legal developments highlighting the importance of inclusion and evidence based curricula.

In August 2018, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, with jurisdiction over school districts in Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Michigan, ruled in the important IDEA case L.H. v. Hamilton County Department of Education, upholding the importance of inclusion under federal law.

In 2013, L.H. was attending Normal Park Elementary School in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He was in a general education classroom which contained students both with and without disabilities. Then the County determined that L.H. would be better off in a comprehensive development classroom (“CDC”) – one where he would be segregated from non-disabled students for much of the day. L.H.’s parents objected citing the IDEA’s requirement that every student has the right to a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment.

L.H.’s parents removed him from the setting and placed L.H. in a private Montessori school.  The Court held that the CDC was not an appropriate setting and ordered the County to reimburse L.H.’s parents for the cost of the private placement.  In reaching its decision the Court noted that the law prefers inclusion and that a student may only be segregated if (1) the student would not benefit from a general education environment; (2) the benefits of the general education setting would be far outweighed by the benefits of the special education setting; or (3) the student would be a disruptive force in a general education classroom.

More recently, in November 2018, the State of Ohio entered into a settlement resolving a class action lawsuit alleging that Ohio’s 11 largest districts failed to adequately serve students with disabilities.  Under the settlement, the districts have committed to improve literacy instruction, provide enhanced support to teachers serving students with disabilities, adopt evidence-based behavior support strategies, improve inclusion opportunities, and provide improved vocational services at the high-school level.  This settlement will be implemented over the next five years.

Schools and districts must recognize the importance of inclusion, supported by evidence-based strategies, in meeting their legal obligations. Experience tells us that the benefits of inclusion are significant and that with proper training behavior strategies can minimize disruptive behavior and make an inclusive setting the preferred environments for students with and without disabilities. Contact us at consulting@ccde.org to develop a training or consulting program that fits your needs.